Posts Tagged 'Restaurant'

33% of children ‘eat crisps daily’

Just over half (58%) of eight to 15-year-olds eat healthy snacks such as fruit, vegetables, seeds or rice cakes compared with 89% who choose “standard” snacks including crisps, biscuits, confectionery and cakes, the YouGov SixthSense study found.

And confectionery as a whole is more popular than fruit, with 63% of children eating it as a snack compared with 54% opting for the latter.

Almost seven in 10 children snack at least once a day, with 16% doing so twice a day or more.

Fruit is the post popular snack among British adults (51%), followed by crisps (43%), sweet or chocolate biscuits (40%), chocolate bars (36%) and other chocolate confectionery (27%).

The study found 46% of male crisp eaters say they eat them because they are hungry, while 36% of women say they eat them to satisfy cravings.

Only 14% of adults consider their children to be slightly overweight and just 1% very overweight, while 2% of eight to 15-year-olds are on a diet.

YouGov SixthSense research director James McCoy said: “Anyone concerned about childhood obesity in Britain will likely find this report alarming. While it’s encouraging that fruit rates highly as a snack choice for children, they are still eating far more crisps and confectionery products.

“With a third of eight to 15-year-olds eating crisps every single day it’s clear that more needs to be done to make healthier snack options more appealing to children.”

YouGov surveyed 2,100 adults between January 23-26 and 502 children aged eight to 15 between January 18-24.

http://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/health/33-of-children-eat-crisps-daily-29159240.html

 

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Parents in UAE admit to caving into child’s fast food demands

ABU DHABI // More than half of parents who give their children unhealthy food regularly do so despite knowing the adverse effects and because of their offsprings’ insistence.

A survey of 999 Emirati parents found that 40 per cent often let their children consume calorie-laden foods such as chips, burgers, pizza and chocolate.

The survey, compiled for Al Aan TV’s Nabd Al Arab (Arabs’ Pulse) programme and The National by YouGov, found that 59 per cent said this was because they cave in to their children who “insist” on eating unhealthy foods.

A further 32 per cent said they gave their children unhealthy foods because they were “picky eaters”.

Other respondents said they had no time to prepare healthy meals at home and said unhealthier foods were more convenient, while some said fast food and ready-to-eat prepackaged dinners were cheaper than preparing a meal from scratch.

Of those who admitted to giving their children unhealthy food, one in 10 admitted they did so “whenever they ask for it”.

More than 50 per cent of respondents said they fed their children unhealthy food “once to twice a week”.

But experts are clear that a healthy lifestyle when a child is young is key to the prevention of weight problems and obesity later, and avoiding illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease.

“Food parents choose for kids these days has become a matter of convenience rather than health,” said Rashi Chowdhary, a Dubai-based nutritionist. “It is easier for parents to order in a pizza over a nutrient rich, home-cooked meal.

“Parents are a child’s biggest role model, but since adults here are completely misinformed about food, they take no time out for any activity and eat unhealthy meals next to their kids, so having unhealthy, overweight or even obese children is bound to happen.

“Kids as young as eight have Type 2 diabetes in the UAE today.”

The answer, she said, was to “encourage your children to eat food in its most natural original form. So choose whole fruit over fruit juices, pick whole grain breads over refined white breads, whole milk over skimmed”. She added: “Start at a young age with kids, and they will grow up to be healthier adults.”

The study found Dubai parents were more than twice as likely to give their children unhealthy food as parents in Abu Dhabi or Sharjah. Of those asked, 42 per cent admitted buying fast food on a “regular basis” for their children.

Hamda Al Hameli said she regularly gave her three children fast food because of its convenience.

“I am a working woman and do not have enough time to cook when I return home,” said the 28-year-old Abu Dhabi resident. “I admit it, most of the time I pick food up.”

Mrs Al Hameli buys takeaways such as baguettes, burgers or hot-dogs for her children three or four times a week.

But Rahma Al Ketbi, a nutrition education manager at the Abu Dhabi-based Imperial College London Diabetes Centre, said parents needed to be role models for healthy eating.

The risk of adult obesity is at least twice as high for obese children than for non-obese children, she said.

“Adolescents are being diagnosed at younger and younger ages due to obesity linked to physical inactivity and unhealthy diets,” she said.

“Children are often more willing and open to learn about healthy choices than adults realise,” she said. “Just don’t force them to choose between cookies and carrots. But, if the option is between fruit and whole-grain crackers with cheese, either choice is a winner.”

http://www.thenational.ae/news/uae-news/health/parents-in-uae-admit-to-caving-into-childs-fast-food-demands

McDonald’s director of nutrition insists the fast food menu is healthy

The director of nutrition for McDonald’s is insisting that the menu offered at the fast food chain is healthy.

Speaking about the launch of the new McWrap, Dr Cindy Goody said healthy eating is a top priority at the franchise

McDonald’s Corp. has been stepping up the pace of its new menu offerings as it struggles to grow sales in the challenging economy. Last year, the company ousted the head of its U.S. division after a monthly sales figure fell for the first time in nearly a decade.

Dr Goody has worked for the Golden Arches since 2008.

Her job is to evaluate the nutritional information of the items on the menu and to consult on healthier options to include.

In an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune this week, when asked point blank if food at McDonald’s was healthy, she responded with a confident ‘I do.’

‘It is possible to eat from the recommended USDA My Plate food groups when visiting McDonald’s. It’s about choice. It’s about customization. It’s about looking at the calories on the menu board.’

The hamburger chain has Dr Goody traveling the country to promote its new found commitment to nutritional food, the inspiration for its new wrap.

The new sandwich will come in three varieties – Chicken & Bacon, Sweet Chili Chicken and Chicken & Ranch.

The Oak Brook, Ill.-based chain says the McWraps use the same type of flour tortillas and chicken as its snack wraps, which were introduced in 2006.

But two of the new McWraps will come with cucumbers, which the company says will mark the first time the vegetable will be part of its core menu. The wraps range from 360 to 600 calories, depending on whether people pick grilled or deep-fried chicken.

Dr Goody highlighted past wins in the nutrition race like smaller sized fries in Happy Meals for kids, reducing calories from 230 to 100, and adding apples to the children’s meal.

For the adults healthier alternatives like yogurt parfait, salads and oatmeal have been added.

She revealed that the restaurant will be offering a new breakfast sandwich in April, the Egg White Delight, that is made with 100 per cent egg whites and has 250 calories compared to the Egg McMuffin’s 300 calories.

They are also looking to incorporate carrots into their menu for kids.

Though she is on the lookout for helping make the brand more health concious, she did concede that the company must first and foremost respond to consumer demand.

‘Other parts of the world have transitioned or offered a whole grain Big Mac bun for their customers because that’s what their customers were asking for. [U.S] customers are not asking for their Big Mac to be on a whole grain bun,’ she said.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2301061/McDonalds-director-nutrition-Dr-Cindy-Goody-insists-fast-food-menu-healthy.html

Health experts: Most fast food kid-friendly meals loaded with fat, salt

WASHINGTON – American families are eating more and more of their meals at chain restaurants. And it turns out, those meals may be playing a big role in the child obesity epidemic.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest — a non-profit consumer group — says almost all the kid meals offered by the big chains have far too much salt and fat. They also have far more calories than any child needs to consume in one sitting.

Working with a research team at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, CSPI looked at nearly 3,500 kid combos at 34 chains, using nutritional data provided by the restaurants.

Ninety-seven percent of the meals did not meet the nutrition standards set by a panel of nutrition and health experts, based in large part on recommendation put forward by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

“One out of every three American children is either overweight or obese, but it is as if much of the restaurant industry didn’t get the memo,” says CSPI nutrition policy director Margo Wootan.

She says many of them are still serving up fried chicken nuggets, macaroni and cheese, pizza and hamburgers with a side order of fries, all accompanied by sugary sodas.

This is the second such survey conducted by the Center for Science in the Public Interest. In 2008, 99 percent of the kids meals flunked the test.

Ameena Batada, who is with the Department of Health and Wellness at the University of North Carolina, Asheville, calls the level of improvement “disappointing.” The two studies — taken side-by-side — show there has been some progress, she says, but much more must be done.

Noah “Bingo” Gray, 13, of New Windsor, Md., knows the problem firsthand. He was one of the kids featured in the TV show “The Biggest Loser” during its last season.

Before he joined the show, he would eat out about five times a week, mostly at fast food restaurants.

“We would order a burger, large drinks, large fries,” Gray says adding, “Now it just seems insane because it is just way too many calories.”

Now a healthy, trim teen with a winning smile, he says, “You’ve got to be able to make good choices when you go out.”

Unfortunately, says CSPI’s Wooton, tracking down healthy meals for kids is like “finding a needle in a haystack.”

But there is one chain that did well in the nutritional survey of kids meals.

Subway’s Fresh Fit for Kids combos met 100 percent of the quality standards set by the panel of experts.

http://www.wtop.com/267/3267120/Health-experts-Most-fast-food-kid-friendly-meals-loaded-with-fat-salt

Fizzy soft drink sales drop for 8th straight year

Americans’ consumption of fizzy soft drinks, on the decline since 2005, fell last year to its lowest level since 1996. If it weren’t for increasingly popular energy drinks like Monster and Red Bull, the decline would have been worse.

The declines come amid heavy attention on soda’s role in obesity and related health problems. Most prominently, the city of New York tried to cap the sizes of high-calorie drinks, though that effort was struck down by a judge earlier this month.

The figures come from Beverage Digest, an industry newsletter that publishes a similar report every March.

The trade journal also found that the pace of decline for carbonated beverages has sped up. Sales volume fell 1.2 per cent last year, compared with a 1 per cent drop in 2011 and a 0.5 per cent drop in 2010. Without energy drinks, volume would have fallen 1.7 per cent.

A three per cent soda price hike helped revenue rise 1.8 per cent to $77.1 billion.

Despite the decline, carbonated soft drinks still make up the biggest category of nonalcoholic beverages.

Total drink sales rose 1 per cent to 15.4 billion cases. Fizzy soft drink sales amounted to 9.2 billion of those cases. Consumers are increasingly drinking more bottled water, tea and energy drinks.

The fastest-growing brands by volume were Monster, up 19.1 per cent; Red Bull, up 17 per cent; Dasani, up 9.1 per cent; Rock-star, up eight per cent; Fanta, up seven per cent; and Arizona, up 6.2 per cent.

The changes in behaviour haven’t changed who the dominant drink makers are, however.

The Coca-Cola Co., which owns Dasani and Powerade, saw its share of the beverage market steady at 34 per cent, while the share of PepsiCo Inc. slid to 26.3.

http://www.canada.com/Fizzy+soft+drink+sales+drop+straight+year/8165470/story.html

KFC are after your children

KFC launches bucket for children; consumer group slams kids meals

 

 

KFC’s new Li’l Bucket Kids Meals are launching at the chicken chain nationwide on the same day that consumer group Center for Science in the Public Interest said nearly all kids meals “flunk nutrition.”

KFC’s new packaging involves a smaller, colorful bucket covered with interactive games. Kids can choose from among several varieties of chicken, sides and drinks.

Each container comes with a pouch of GoGo squeeZ applesauce, which looks a little bit like those plastic “flask on the fly” Pocket Shot booze bags that sparked controversy a few years back.

The Li’l Bucket costs $3.99 plus tax. At its most healthful – a grilled drumstick, green beans, CapriSun Roarin’ Water and the no-spoon applesauce – the bucket carries 210 calories, 4 grams of fat and 565 milligrams of sodium.

But kids also have other options, which include extra crispy chicken tenders, mac n’ cheese and milk.

KFC is based in Louisville, Ky., and is owned by Taco Bell parent Yum Brands. The chicken chain has more than 17,000 outlets in 115 countries.

Just as the Li’l Bucket was being rolled out across the country, the Center for Science in the Public Interest was releasing a report blasting the 97% of kids meals it accuses of not meeting nutritional standards.

Of nearly 3,500 meal possibilities, the CSPI said the vast majority are crammed with fried chicken fingers, burgers, French fries and sugary drinks – inappropriate options for 4- to 8-year-olds. The group says kids meals should stay under 430 calories, contain at least half a serving of fruit or vegetables and exclude super-sweet drinks.

Only sandwich chain Subway, with its Fresh Fit for Kids meals offering apple slices and low-fat milk or bottled water, seems to have emerged on the CSPI’s good side.

At 19 chains, including McDonald’s, Chipotle and Hardee’s, no combination of children’s options met the CSPI’s specifications, the group said.

Another organization, the Center for Consumer Freedom, promptly responded to the CSPI report, accusing it of playing a “blame game.”

“When it comes to childhood obesity, the Center for Science in the Public Interest is missing the forest for the trees,” J. Justin Wilson, senior research analyst at the CCF, said in a statement. “Childhood obesity is a result of a myriad of factors, not just restaurant offerings. Regulating kids’ menus to only offer quinoa salads isn’t going to make any measurable weight difference in America’s youth.”

Kids meals are on the decline, according to research company the NPD Group. As of 2011, traffic into eateries from families with kids is flat after several years of declines. Health concerns are also a factor.

“In addition to the economic factor, kids have become more sophisticated, and just like adults, they want to try new things, new foods,” said NPD analyst Bonnie Riggs in a statement. “Kids have a wider variety of foods and flavors available to them today than they have in the past.”

 

http://www.latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-kfc-kids-bucket-cspi-20130328,0,2066163.story

McDonald’s freaks out because young people don’t like them anymore

McDonald’s greatest fear is not rampant obesity. A recently leaked internal memo from the company indicates its executives are totally freaking out because McDonald’s didn’t make the top ten list of millennials’ favorite restaurants, despite being the No. 1 fast-food chain in the country. Apparently, America’s largest generation prefers healthier and more sustainable food options. Go figure. But don’t worry everyone, McDonald’s will be all right. They’ve got a great plan centered on fried chicken and lettuce swaddled in a tortilla. The company hopes its new McWrap menu item will draw in those young people who are looking for something fresh-looking and vaguely organic.

 

http://now.msn.com/mcdonalds-millennials-memo-reveals-worries-about-youth-appeal